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  • An aortic thromboembolism results when a blood clot is dislodged and travels through the aorta, becoming lodged in a distant location. This causes severely reduced blood flow to the tissues receiving blood from that particular part of the aorta, leading to decreased oxygen in the tissues. Mixed breed cats, Abyssinian, Ragdoll, and Birmans are the most commonly affected. Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. Other signs may include decreased or absent pulses in the femoral arteries of the rear legs, rapid breathing or difficulty breathing, vocalization from pain, vomiting, and the nailbeds and footpads may be pale or bluish. Initially, cats may need to be treated as inpatients. Drugs to prevent platelets from clumping together will be prescribed. The expected course of this disorder is days to weeks for full recovery of function to the legs, but the prognosis in general is very poor.

  • An aortic thromboembolism results when a blood clot is dislodged and travels through the aorta, becoming lodged in a distant location. This causes severely reduced blood flow to the tissues receiving blood from that particular part of the aorta, leading to decreased oxygen in the tissues. Aortic thromboembolism is a rare occurrence in dogs and can be associated with can be associated with endocarditis, cancer, sepsis, hyperadrenocorticism, and with increased protein-loss through diseased kidneys. Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. Initially, dogs may need to be treated as inpatients. Drugs to prevent platelets from clumping together will be prescribed. The expected course of this disorder is days to weeks for full recovery of function to the legs, but the prognosis in general is very poor.

  • In order to properly treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions, topical ear medications are often necessary. Instilling ear medications into your cat's ears can be a challenging task, especially if they are uncomfortable. Have patience and contact your veterinarian if you are having difficulties.

  • Topical ear medications are often necessary to adequately treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions. Instilling ear medications into your dog's ears can be a challenging or potentially difficult task, especially if they are uncomfortable. Have patience and contact your veterinarian if you are having difficulties.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Gently clean away any debris around your cat's eyes with warm water and a washcloth. Hold the bottle using the thumb and index finger of your dominant hand with the tip pointed downwards. Use the last two fingers of the same hand to pull back the upper eyelid. Place your remaining fingers under the cat's jaw to support the head. The lower eyelid will act as a pouch to receive the drops. DO NOT touch the eye's surface with the applicator. Aiming for the center of the eye, squeeze the desired number of drops onto the eyeball.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.

  • Applying eye ointments to your cat's eye(s) can be a challenging or easy task. The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your cat's prompt recovery. It is important to use the medication as directed for the full duration and contact your veterinarian if you have problems. The tips and instructions in this handout may make administering your cat's eye ointment easier.

  • Applying eye ointments to your dog's eye(s) can be a challenging or easy task. The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your dog’s prompt recovery. It is important to use the medication as directed for the full duration and contact your veterinarian if you have problems. The tips and instructions in this handout may make administering your dog’s eye ointment easier.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. Creams, ointments, and lotions are for external use only. It is important to prevent your cat from licking and swallowing any of these external preparations as they may contain ingredients that could be harmful if swallowed. Most topical preparations work better if they are gently massaged in for a few moments after application. It is always a good idea to get someone to help hold your cat, especially when applying medications on a sensitive or painful area. If you still have trouble keeping your pet from licking the medication, please contact your veterinarian to get your cat fitted for an Elizabethan collar.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. Creams, ointments, and lotions are for external use only. It is important to prevent your dog from licking and swallowing any of these external preparations, as they may contain ingredients that could be harmful if swallowed. A good tip in this case is to apply the product just before feeding your dog or take your dog for a short walk immediately after applying the medication. If you still have trouble keeping your pet from licking the medication, contact your veterinarian and they can supply you with an Elizabethan collar.

Royal Ford Veterinary Hospital
610 Ford Drive, Unit 3
Oakville, Ontario L6J 7V7
Phone: 905-337-1880

Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday: 8:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am – 1:00pm
Sunday: Closed